Anonymous

What Are The Most Addictive Drugs?

43 Answers

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
In order to answer this question you first need to define "addiction.” There are two ways of looking at this, clinically. First of all, one definition of addiction describes it as a behavioral disorder in which a person continues to participate in an activity that they know will result in negative consequences. This is how you can classify substance abuse and gambling in the same category. Secondly, though, addiction also refers to an extreme level of physical dependence on a substance.

In terms of substances or chemicals that are physically addictive, you may be surprised with what you find. While the ranking of the most addictive drugs in the world will vary depending on the source, experts seem to agree on which ones are indeed the most addictive. In terms of classification, amphetamines are, as you might expect, always near the top of the list, followed by some of the more powerful opiates. Ironically, although the majority of these lists will differ, the number one most addictive drug in the word is always the same.

Crack cocaine, which is a more powerful, smokeable version of cocaine ranks very closely to crystal methamphetamine and always within the top 5. They are both nearly equal in administration as well as effects and likelihood for addiction. In fact, you could argue that the only difference between them is that the latter is synthetic.

However, the most addictive substance in the world is nicotine, which is the active chemical in tobacco. Studies consistently show that while marijuana, caffeine, and alcohol are among the most commonly used drugs, especially in America, nicotine is the one with the highest rate of reinforcement (continued use) and dependence (difficulty with cessation). Perhaps what is most dangerous about this is that nicotine is the only "drug” in the top 5 that is legal!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The following is a list of the top 20 most addictive substances. The addictiveness rating is calculated based on the results of two separate studies. The first was a study undertaken by John Hastings for In Health Magazine. The second, from a study by Robert Gore and Mitchell Earlywine, entitled 'Marijuana's Perceived Addictiveness: A Survey of Clinicians and Researchers'. It is taken from the book Pot Politics: Marijuana and the Politics and the Costs of Prohibition

Further studies into the field of drug addictive include those by Dr Jack Henningfield Ph. D (who contributed his advice to this article) and Neal L. Benowitz M.D. The results of these two tests were published in an article in the New York Times, entitled: Is Nicotine Addictive? It depends on whose criteria you use, published August 2nd, 1994.

#20 Methadone

Addiction Likelihood = No data
Although according to NARCONON methadone can be as addictive as heroin


Also Known As
Symoron, Amidone, Methadose, Heptadon, and more. Sometimes known as meth, linctus, or mixture.

History
Developed in Germany in the 1930s as a synthetic opiod, methadone was used as a pain killer by German soldiers in World War II. It was introduced in the USA in 1947 by Eli Lilly in 1947, under the trade name 'Dolophine'. Since this time, it has been used in the treatment of narcotic addiction, most notably heroin.

Effects
Methadone is a sedative drug that depresses the nervous system. It can help to relieve feelings of anxiety, and reduce physical and psychological pain. Notably, methadone does not give rise to feelings of euphoria, which heroin does.

Common administration
Methadone was traditionally administered in the form of a racemic oral solution. Now it's also common to take it as a traditional pill or in the form of a powder, dissolvable in water.

Health issues
There are several listed adverse effects of methadone on the body. These include hypoventilation, constipation, chronic fatigue, reduced blood pressure, vomiting, cardiac arrhythmia, mood changes, insomnia, and impotence.

#19 Mescaline

Addiction Likelihood = 16%


Also Known As
3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine

History
Extracted from various types of cactus, such as the peyote and the San Pedro, mescaline was first used in Native American religious ceremonies. Once it reached Europe the drug became popular with many writers and artists. Aldous Huxley, Aleister Crowley, and Pablo Picasso are all said to have experimented with Mescaline.

Effects
Mescaline can cause hallucinations, usually consistent with actual experiences (rather than imagined ones as with LSD). Intensification of light and colour is common, as is synesthesia. Effects can last for up to 12 hours.

Common Administration
The cacti which contain mescaline are prepared by removing their 'heads' and drying them to make disk-shaped buttons. These buttons can be chewed or soaked in water to make a drink. Sometimes users grind the dried buttons to make capsules which can be swallowed. The effective dose of pure mescaline in a human is 300-500mg.

Health issues
Small doses of mescaline can speed up the heart, raise blood pressure, and cause illness or nausea. Higher doses may induce bloody diarrhoea and loss of consciousness. Long-term effects can include flashbacks, or hallucinogen persisting disorder.

#18 Psilocybin Mushrooms

Addiction Likelihood = 17%


Also Known As
Contains psilocybin and psilocin. Also known as magic mushrooms or shrooms.

History
The use of hallucinogenic mushrooms is thought to date back to prehistoric times. However, the use of 'magic mushrooms' in Western culture was only first popularized in the 1950s. Since then the availability of the psilocybe mushroom has made it one of the most widely-used hallucinogens in the World.

Effects
Magic mushrooms can bring about hallucinations, along with feelings of euphoria and elation. Users may experience stomach-ache, sickness and/or diarrhoea. There is a risk of a 'bad trip' which can cause emotional and psychological distress. Effects of psilocybin mushrooms typically last from 3 to 8 hours.

Common Administration
Magic mushrooms are eaten raw, dried, cooked in food, or stewed in a tea.

Health issues
Eating psilocybin mushrooms can cause stomach pains, nausea and vomiting, and can complicate existing mental health problems. One of the main health risks is that users may eat the wrong kind of mushroom.

#17 LSD

Addiction Likelihood = 32%


Also Known As
Lysergic acid diethylamide. Known as LSD, LSD-25, or acid

History
LSD was first produced and ingested by Albert Hoffmann in 1938, synthesized from ergot, a grain fungus. It was first used as a drug to treat psychiatric conditions, but abuse of the drug in the mid twentieth century led to it being criminalized.

Effects
Short term effects of LSD include a distorted perception of time and space, hallucinations, and heightened senses. LSD can also bring on psychological or emotional effects such as anxiety, depression, paranoia or dizziness. Physical effects can include lowered body temperature, nausea, vomiting and convulsions.

Common Administration
LSD is a colourless and tasteless crystalline substance which is soluble in water. It is typically ingested via blotting paper, tablets, capsules, or gelatine sheets.

Health issues
Aside from a growing tolerance to the drug, the long-term effects of acid can include flashbacks, anxiety and depression. There is little evidence of any physical dangers of long-term LSD use.

#16 Ecstasy

Addiction Likelihood = 40%


Also Known As
MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Also known as 'E' or pills.

History
MDMA was originally known as 'Empathy' and before it was criminalized, was used in psychotherapy to treat patients with clinical depression. 1980s ecstasy's popularity as a street drug boomed in the UK and parts of Europe, linked with rave culture. MDMA has since become one of the four most widely-used illicit drugs in the USA.

Effects
Ecstasy heightens a user's energy, making them feel more alert and alive. It can make colours and sounds appear more intense, induce feelings of intimacy and empathy, and decrease hostility and insecurity. The drug decreases appetite and can cause short-term memory loss.

Common Administration
Ecstasy is normally ingested orally in the form of tablets or crushed into powder

Health issues
Common health risks of MDMA include increased body temperature and blood pressure, hyperthermia, dehydration and hyponatremia. Effects of chronic use can include long-term memory loss, anxiety, and depression.

#15 Cannabis

Addiction Likelihood = 42%


Also Known As
Cannabis sativa. Active chemical compound: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Also known as marijuana, ganja, weed

History
Evidence of cannabis use dates back to as far as 3BC, and it was popular among the ancient Hindus of India and Nepal. It has been used throughout history for religious, spiritual and medicinal purposes. Although now illegal in most countries, recreational use in Western countries has led to such a demand that cannabis is now the largest cash crop in the USA.

Effects
Subjective psychoactive effects (a 'high') vary depending on the individual and the method of use. Common reported effects include feelings of relaxation, increased appetite, sensory awareness, or a feeling of slowing of time. Physical and neurological effects include increased heart rate, lowered blood pressure, and impairment of concentration and psychomotor coordination.

Common Administration
Cannabis is consumed in a number of different ways, most of which either inhaling the smoke from an ignited plant, or ingesting orally.

Health issues
Besides the risk of lung disease and respiratory illness through smoking the plant, there is evidence that cannabis can also lead to or exaggerate mental health problems.

#14 PCP

Addiction Likelihood = 55%


Also Known As
Phencyclidine. Street names include: Angel dust, supergrass, boat, and tic tac

History
Originally tested as a surgical anaesthetic after World War II, the use of PCP in medicine was halted in the 1960s due to its adverse side effects.

Effects
Psychological effects associated with PCP can include changes in mood, depersonalization, hallucinations, and euphoria.  

Common Administration
PCP is generally ingested in one of three ways: Snorted, swallowed, or smoked. It is most commonly added to cannabis joints and smoked as an 'embalming fluid' to intensify the effects of marijuana.

Health issues
Chronic abuse of PCP can impair memory and thinking. Long-time users may develop speech difficulties, suicidal ideation, anxiety, depression, and social withdrawal.

#13 Caffeine

Addiction Likelihood = 67%


Also Known As
1,3,7-trimethylxanthine, trimethylxanthine, theine, methyltheobromine

History
Caffeine has been consumed by humans since the Stone Age. If you believe the Chinese legend, the first caffeinated drink was created by the Emperor of China Shennong in 3000BC, when he accidentally dropped some leaves in boiling water and drank the result.

Effects
Caffeine stimulates the heart, respiratory system, and central nervous system, causing the user to feel more alert. It is classed as an ergogenic, which increases the capacity for mental or physical activity.

Common Administration
Almost always, caffeine is administered in the form of a drink, made from caffeine containing plants - the most popular being coffee, tea, and cacao.

Health issues
Caffeine can make a person feel restless, anxious and irritable. It has a number of physical side effects, which can include dizziness, dryness in the mouth, diarrhoea, nausea and hypoglycaemia.

#12 Cocaine

Addiction Likelihood = 78%


Also Known As
Benzoylmethylecgonine. Also known as: Coke, snow, Charlie, white

History
Cocaine has been used for thousands of years by indigenous South Americans, who chew the coca leaf. It was popularized in Europe in the mid 1800s, when coca and cocaine were used to make wine, anaesthetics, and, famously, Coca-Cola.

Effects
The main effects of cocaine are hyperactivity, restlessness, increased blood pressure, increased heart rate, and euphoria. Effects can last between 20 minutes and a few hours depending on dosage, purity, and the way it is administered.

Common Administration
There are a range of ways cocaine is administered, including orally (e.g. Rubbing on gums, applying to a cigarette and smoking it), chewing the coca leaf, insufflation (known as 'snorting'), injection, or inhalation.

Health issues
Chronic use of cocaine can cause a number of health problems, including increased risk of strokes, reduced attention, lethargy, lung disease, increased risk of heart attack, as well as psychological problems.

#11 Amphetamine

Addiction Likelihood = 81%
Britney Spears Has Tested Positive for Amphetamine


Also Known As
Speed, whizz, base.

History
Amphetamine was first use as an artificial replacement for ephedrine in the early 20th century. Placed in an inhaler under the trade name Benzedrine, the drug was used extensively during the Second World War to combat fatigue in soldiers. Benzedrine was later banned by The Food and Drug Administration agency due to problems with abuse,

Effects
The psychological effects of amphetamine can include increased confidence, creative thinking, euphoria, increased concentration, and an increased sense of well being. Physical include headache, hyperactivity, sweating, blurred vision, diarrhoea, and erectile dysfunction.

Common Administration
Amphetamine can be ingested by orally, whereupon the effects will be felt in around 30 minutes; or injected, in which case the effects will start much quicker and can last for around six hours.

Health issues
Taking amphetamine can lead to an increase in blood pressure and heart rate, cause depression and irritability, and reduce the effectiveness of the immune system.

#10: Alcohol

Addiction Likelihood = 82%
Lindsay Lohan Binge Drinking


History
Chemical traces in pots discovered in Northern China, suggests that alcohol has been fermented and consumed by humans for more than 9,000 years. Muslim chemists were the first to create fully purified, distilled alcohol. Alcoholic beverages are now consumed in almost every nation for recreational purposes, medicinal reasons, and for its effects as a relaxant.

Effects
Alcohol acts a relaxant and, as such, can reduce feelings of anxiety and inhibitions, making the user feel more sociable. Other short-term effects include intoxication, dehydration, and alcohol posioining.

Common Administration
Alcohol is generally consumed in the form of a drink. These drinks come in three main classes: Beer, wine, and spirits.

Health issues
Alcohol can have a number of serious, long-term health effects associated with chronic use. These include heart disease, dementia, cancer, diabetes, stroke, and alcoholism.

#9 Seconal

Addiction Likelihood = 82%
The cause of Judy Garland's death was an accidental overdose of Secona


Also Known As
Secrobarbital. Often known as 'reds' or 'red hearts'

History
Seconal was first synthesized in 1928 and was marketed by Eli Lily as a sedative. It also has anaesthetic, anticonvulsant and hypnotic properties, and is used to treat epilepsy, insomnia and as an anaesthetic in surgery.

Effects
Seconal slows activity in the brain, relieving anxiety and inducing sleep.

Common Administration
Seconal is available as 100mg capsules. It is available as either a free acid or a sodium salt, which is soluble in water and ethanol.

Health issues
Possible side effects of Seconal include impaired coordination, confusion, headache, nausea, vomiting, nightmares, and allergic reactions. Withdrawal symptoms can include anxiety, insomnia, seizures, tremors and lack of appetite.

#8 Quaalude

Addiction Likelihood = 83%


Also Known As
Methaqualone

History
First synthesized in India in 1956, Quaalude was introduced in Europe and Japan as a safe barbiturate substitute. Around the height of its popularity as a sedative medicine, in the mid-1960s, it started to become a popular recreational drug too. Quaalude was popular with American college students, who would 'lude out' on a regular basis.

Effects
Effects of Quaalude in small doses can include relaxation, euphoria, reduced heart rate, increased sexual arousal and parasthesias. Higher doses can bring on depression, slurred speech, and headaches.

Common Administration
Quaalude is taken in the form of a tablet or it can be smoked. If smoked, it instantly induces a trance-like euphoria, which quickly wears off.

Health issues
Health risks include death from overdose, or emphysema and other lung diseases, if smoked.

#7 Diazepam

Addiction Likelihood = 86%



Also Known As
Valium

History
Diazepam was first marketed by Sternbach under the name Valium in 1963. It was the top selling pharmaceutical in the US from 1968 to 1982. It is used for the treatment of sleep disorders, depression, alcohol withdrawal, and bipolar disorder.

Effects
Diazepam has a sedative and relaxing effect that can help to induce sleep. Side-effects can include impaired motor function, depression, anterograde amnesia, and cognitive deficits.

Common Administration
Dosages are normally determined on an individual basis, and range from 2mg per dose to 10mg per dose, depending on the severity of the symptoms exhibited by the patient.

Health issues
In some cases use of Diazepam can bring on nervousness, insomnia, muscle cramps, rage and violence. Overdoses of Diazepam are rarely fatal, unless mixed with other substances.

#6 Heroin

Addiction Likelihood = 87.5%



Also Known As
Dacetylmorphine. Also known as smack, horse, gear, skag, brown

History
The opium poppy, from which heroin is derived, was first cultivated in Mesopotamia as long ago as 3400BC. Diacetylmorphine was first synthesized in the late 1800s and was marketed as Heroin by German pharmaceutical company Bayer as a non-addictive morphine substitute and cough remedy. It was later discovered that diacetylmorphine did, in fact, metabolize into morphine very quickly.

Effects
Short-term effects of using Heroin can include euphoria, an alternating state of alertness and drowsiness, mouth dryness, warm flushing, and slowed breathing.

Common Administration
Heroin is commonly administered intravenously (often known as 'shooting up) where the base is dissolved in water and injected into the bloodstream. Users may also snort or smoke Heroin.

Health issues
There are many long-term health risks associated with Heroin. Aside from addiction itself, these can include collapsed veins, heart infection, decreased liver function, and abscesses.

#5 Oxycodone

Addiction Likelihood = 99%
Jack (LOST) looking for his oxycodone pills


Also Known As
OxyContin, Perocet, Tylox, Percodan, and more. Often known as Hillbilly Heroin

History
Oxycodone was first synthesized in 1916 by Freund and Spreyer of the University of Frankfurt. It was later mass produced by Bayer as a dependence-free pain relief solution to morphine and heroin (which the company had already been forced to stop production of). Oxycodone has been used in Pharmaceutical drugs such as OxyContin, Percocet (which also includes paracetamol), and Percodan (which includes aspirin).

Effects
Common effects of Oxycodone consumption include lightheadedness, euphoria, fatigue, nausea, headache, anxiety and constipation.

Common administration
Oxycodone can be consumed orally, rectally, intranasally, or via injection. 10-15mg of oxycodone equates to roughly the same analgesic effect as 10mg of morphine.

Health issues
Negative health issues arising from taking Oxycodone can include mood changes, fainting, seizures, swelling of the eyes, and difficulty swallowing.

#4 Crystal Meth

Addiction Likelihood = 89.5%


Also Known As
Methamphetamine, injected. Also known as tik, shabu, ice, glass, crank, meth

History
Methamphetamine was discovered in 1894 by Japanese chemist Nagayoshi Nagai, who synthesized it from ephedrine. It was used by the German military in World War II, where it was dispensed to pilots and tank crews in the form of chocolate. It is said that in Hitler's later years he was regularly injected with methamphetamine to combat his depression and fatigue.

Effects
Crystal meth brings on a feeling of exhilaration and a sharpening of focus, making the user feel more alert. It also induces a feeling of sexual liberation and is able to keep users awake for many hours. Smoking ice causes body temperature to rise, and blood pressure and respiratory rates increase. The drug can bring about hallucinations, paranoia, and psychotic behaviour.

Common administration
Intravenous injection of crystal meth is the fastest-acting method of inducement, followed by smoking, anal insertion, insufflation ('snorting') and ingestion.

Health issues
Overuse of crystal meth can bring about paranoia, short term memory loss, wild rages, mood swings, and damage the nervous system. Overdosing can result in severe convulsions, circulatory and respiratory problems, coma, and death.

#3 Ice, Glass

Addiction Likelihood = 92.5%


Also Known As
Methamphetamine, smoked

History
See entry for #4 Crystal Meth

Effects
Effects of smoking methamphetamine are virtually the same as if it were injected (see #4 Crystal Meth). Smoking ice causes body temperature to rise, and blood pressure and respiratory rates increase.

Common administration
Ice is typically smoked in a glass pipe, light bulbs, or on aluminium foil heated from the bottom. The process is known as 'chasing the white dragon'.

Health issues
Smoking crystal meth can bring on the same health issues as reported above (#4 Crystal Meth). However, there are added risks when smoking ice on a long-term basis, such as lung damage and severe tooth decay.

#2 Crack

Addiction Likelihood = 95.5%


Also Known As
Methylbenzoylecgonine. Also known as rock, wash, stones, freebase

History
Crack cocaine first sprung up in the inner-city neighbourhoods of New York, Los Angeles and Miami in the mid-1980s. Faced with dropping street prices of cocaine at the time, drug dealers converted the powder into crack, which could be sold in smaller dosages and to more people. It resulted in a 'crack epidemic' in the United States between 1984 and 1990, bringing about a massive increase in addiction, theft, homlessness and murder.

Effects
Crack affects the brain chemistry of the user, bringing on euphoria, alertness, confidence, increased energy, loss of appetite, and in some cases, paranoia. Physiological effects include increased body temperature, dilation of pupils, constriction of blood vessels, tremors, and twitches.

Common administration
Crack, or 'freebase cocaine', is made by dissolving powder cocaine in water and adding a strong alkaloid solution, such as ammonia or baking powder. A flammable solvent such as ether is then added and a solid cocaine base is separated out from the mixture. Most users smoke crack through a pipe, although it is sometimes injected intravenously.  

Health issues
After the short-lived euphoria associated with a hit of crack, a crash follows, which can involve anxiety, anhedonia, depression, fatigue, and irritability. There are also health issues associated with toxicity, smoking-related illness, and the risk of contracting diseases by sharing pipes.

#1 Tobacco

Addiction Likelihood = 96.5%


Also Known As
Nicotiana

History
Tobacco was originally used by Native Americans with many consuming it as an entheogen, in shamanic or religious ceremonies. Many believed the tobacco plant was a gift from God and the smoke would carry their thoughts and prayers up to heaven. After the arrival of the Europeans into America, tobacco was exported and became a hugely successful trade item, creating a booming industry in the Southern States of the USA. It wasn't until the mid-1900s that scientific evidence revealed the true harmful effects of smoking tobacco.

Effects
The short-term effects of tobacco can include rise in blood pressure and heart rate, stimulation then reduction of activity in the brain and central nervous system, production of stomach acid, dizziness, and weakening of appetite, taste and smell.

Common administration
Tobacco is generally consumed by smoking it, although it is possible to attain thee same effects from the drug by chewing it. Tobacco can be smoked in the form of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar.

Health issues
The health risks of smoking tobacco are well documented. Physical effects can include Cancer, pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, oral conditions, infections, and reproductive problems.  

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1 Person thanked the writer.
Chris Tackett
Chris Tackett commented
Although I found this article to be very interesting as well as informative I think that This can only be answered on a per user basis. This question is a catch 22 so to say. If caffene is your "drug of choice" then its going to be your "most addictive" if you like speed the meth or coccaine will probably be in your top 5. If your " drug of choice" is opiates then heroin of oxy will probably be in your top 5.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Wow
i learnt a lot
very interesting
addiction is an incredibly complicated thing
i would guess that in the majority of cases
the symptom of addiction is the drug
and the cause is something far deeper
to do with the psychology of the user
it's a big issue
i'm not addicted to anything
but i do think of death a lot
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Wow
i thought that heroin or better, opiates were most addicting drugs, here in my country the numbers say only 1 of every 100 people that try heroin becomes addict, and also that you can´t quit when you want, that the addiction is so strong that you need the drug like every 8 hours or something like that, the addicted needs some drug, if he/she don´t get some will expirience nausea and some other syptoms that will be very harmful
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
This article needs to be reported as harmful, as it does not provide any form of accurate data AT ALL, and NONE of it should be taken as truth.  I am researching marijuana, and was immediately suspicious of the information I found here.  For example, the John Hastings study ranks marijuana at 21/100 for addiction.  This does NOT equal a 21% addiction rate, and using the provided links I do not understand how the author came CLOSE to stating a 42% likelihood of addiction, as that number is not listed ANYWHERE in the provided links.  In fact, studies and reports dating back to the 1944 (en.wikipedia.org have shown that marijuana is NOT physically addictive (psychological dependency can occur in heavy users, but these are typically associated with underlying problems such as untreated depression or anxiety www.druglibrary.org Furthermore,  this article states that cannabis users are susceptible to lung disease, respiratory illness, and mental health issues.  The Schaffer report link I included above clearly states that there is no evidence of ANY KIND of lung disease or respiratory illness other than paralysis of the cilia, which is primarily due to the inhalation of heated plant material; edible/topical/vaporized use has no respiratory effects.  The ONLY instance of marijuana causing mental illness is in those with a certain genetic makeup that pre-disposes them for schizophrenia and begin marijuana use at an early age (www.schizophrenia.com In fact, recent studies show that marijuana use may even stimulate brain cell growth (www.sciencedaily.com any of this is not evidence enough, just look at the percentage rate of tobacco addiction.  By this article's claim, virtually every person who even tries tobacco will become addicted.  This entire article is straight misinformation, and I shudder to think how many ignorant web-surfers stumble across this article and accept it as truth.
thanked the writer.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Thank you for the actually knowledge based comment all these people know nothing but what they hear from the DEA.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Opioids of any kind are the most addicting of all drugs - Hands down!
Morphine codeine hydrocodone oxycodone fentanol heroin and the list goes on forever it seem. I have seen first hand the physiological pain associated from withdraw. Also strong opioids and severe alcoholism are the only drugs with possibly deadly withdraw symptoms. Which means no cold turkey, you must ween yourself from the substance. Sadly our own medical community are freely passing out the strongest opioid known to man without considering the consequences. It is unethical and completely destroying my local area here in Southern Ohio. Look it you,p they are calling us pillbillies, its a very bad problem.
Nicotine is highly addictive but does not destroy your life like other addictions can, except for shorting because of higher risks of cancer and lung issues.
Cannabis - AHhhhhhhhhhhhhh - Enjoyed it for years with a lot less  mental anguish than cigarettes (which I finally quit after much failure). It also doesn't work in the same manner as other "drugs" cannabis does not trigger the reward system in your brain, which seems to me, is the main cause of addiction.
Cocaine - Surprisingly not as bad as one would think. Produces a 300 - 500% endorphin spike.
Meth - Worse yet -  produces a 600 - 1200% endorphin spike.
Caffeine - The most widely used stimulant on earth. Not good for some people with certain underline heath conditions.
Most hallucinogenics are non addicting with the exception of one or two.

The government lies about drugs and the schools lie to our kids about them. When a child grows up and realize we lied about "pot" then they don't believe the real dangers we stressed with others drugs. STOP THE WAR ON DRUGS!!
nik hoxsty Profile
nik hoxsty answered
I have experimented with many drugs in my day and I can say for one that weed, mushrooms,  mescaline and lsd are not addictive at all.  Methadone, heroine, alch., meth, crack, benzos and ops are all the most addicting substances in the world they will all destroy you. They will take your money your family and friends until all you have left is a pipe a line or a needle.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Your facts are fuzzy to say the least...

Crack was in play WAY before the mid 80's, in fact it was very popular in the mid to late 70's. And Mescaline is NOT addictive:

www.narconon.ca
(read the last sentence in this report.
wilbert u can call me sue Profile
Opiates such as morphine, heroin, are very addictive, but now with all the new combinations out there, drugs are becoming cheaper to produce and more addictive, like crack cocaine and crystal meth also, oxicondin has become very addictive due to the process in which it is consumed. Many drugs if crushed and smoked or injected become more powerful and more addictive
Nikki McLaughlin Profile
I think the better question would be to ask yourself, Why do I want to use these drugs, and is addiction something that I want to deal with?
anupama kumar Profile
anupama kumar answered
This is a difficult question to answer because it depends upon a lot of factors in both
the drug and the person who uses it.
Heroin
Nicotine
Cocaine
Are most addictive drugs

Zaphod Beeblebrox Profile
Methadone is more addictive than oxycodone. I know from experience - I became addicted to methadone (on prescription) while awaiting a discectomy, because oxy wasn't cutting it. Withdrawal after the op was hell.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
There are a lot of things to take into account here. It's nearly impossible to compile a list such as this when considering such factors as addictive personalities and the difference between psychological and physical addiction. Besides the fact that different people have different chemical makeups, personalities, and seek different results. If this list is looking at both psychical and psychological addiction, I can see all these drugs being in this list, but not in this order. Let alone the fact that its hardly fair to not mention that differentiation. But what strikes me more than anything in this list, is the fact that many of the drugs they claim are more addictive are legal, by prescription, but nonetheless. Ironically, the illegal drugs could be used for the same medicinal purposes, and are usually more effective,. But why would doctors and shrinks want to give us meds that are not as addictive? God forbid we don't come back for more and the pharmacists don't have the money to have their house payments for their mansions.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The most is buceta. Cu is also very addictive.in the history of humanity it was, is and always will be what makes the universe move. You can call it different names. Classic, scientific names, but the "things" are the same. Once, just once you tried and you are hooked 100 % hooked for the first time. Even if you never tried you are already in need of it. Thats why when you can not enjoy you look them for something else, like made up drugs like the list above.
Jack Turner Profile
Jack Turner answered

Heroin, I think is mostly dangerous among all the drugs as it attacks the nervous system so strongly that a person find it difficult to survive without it.

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I think  you have  observed  some very interesting  details, appreciate it for the post. 
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered

Most people would be smart NOT  to do drugs or it will screw you up. But, I can't be the only one to help, there are others out there. So be smart and DON'T DO DRUGS!!!

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Okay, I have been smoking quit a bit of weed lately. But there is no way I'm addicted. I have a WHOLE lot of it hidden away and I may not even smoke it. Definetly not addictive. This is complete garbage.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
This list has so much BS on it. You cannot become addicted to psychedelic drugs (LSD, psilocybin, mescaline) and I seriously doubt that 42% of people get addicted to marijuana.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Theres a lot of bs out there about drugs. Thats because drugs are complex, and our bodies are complex, so little is known about any drug. Yeah this list names a lot of drugs that most evidence is suggesting arent addictive, but atleast it doesnt rate nicotine as less addictive than "hard" drugs, like most naive sources would. Nicotine and alcohol are worse for your health than most illegal drugs used, including heroin and cocaine, atleast according to all the evidence. This idea that illegal drugs are automatically worse than legal drugs is a mistake too many people are making
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
This is such bs, you can't get addicted to pot lsd or shrooms, haah what the heck, you can't even do lsd without waiting a few weeks because of the tolerance buld up. The only thing right on here it nicotine ha
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I think addictiveness should be rated on how fast you get addictive
from a 1 time use you have to get use to nicotine to become
addicted but when you do its tough to quit just like anything.

I believe those other drugs would be more addictive like Heroin
& Cocaine
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
A lot of people on here seem to be moaning how incorrect cannabis addiction is, I would say 42% is an accurate statement, When I was 15 me an four other friends started smoking weed, six years later 3 of these friends still smoke pot heavier than they have ever done, only me an one other friend have kicked it.
I don't kno when this list was made, but I would rate mephedrone higher than cocaine, I have taken both, and have found meph way more Moorish, it scared the s*** out of me,
Tobacco tho deserves to be top for me, I think quitting will be one of the hardest things I will have to do,
unless I get addicted I get addicted to smack! Ha!
Edward The Thirteenth Profile
Thanks for these wonderful informations, first of all the infos listed about each drug is awesome I mean you have to search and search and go into meaningless readings and huge paragraphs and pages to get some of these listed here, and YES nicotine is listed as the most addictive by most scientists, watched many reports on tv about it, I'm an ex-smoker, maybe it wasn't hard for me to quit but some people try and try again and never quit, yes nicotine is terribly addicting I hate it, after making many researches this list is quite correct, and a plus, I've made a friend quit smoking :)
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Where are you getting this data? It's garbage. According the Center for Disease Control, Cannabis nor Psilocybin Mushrooms are addictive whatsoever. Way to go keep the disinformation movement rolling along.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Meth is the most addictive. I would say 99.9%   will do it again if you do it once. I'm lucky. Started when I was 13! Been Meth free 2 years and 8 months, and on my own. No treatment, just my wonderful husband. If we can do I,t anyone can! You just have to want to, and support always helps!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Wow. Completely wrong. All of these percentages seem to be made up.  42 percent marijuana addiction?? Think about that for two seconds and you see it doesn't add up. About 60 percent of high school kids report having tried marijuana (probably more are afraid to admit).  42 percent of 60 percent (0.42 X 0.6) is 25.2% will be addicted for good. Your telling me a quarter of our population is addicted to marijuana? Obviously false.  Marijuana is not addictive. Marijuana is not a "gateway drug". Stop listening to government lies.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
LOL a lot of this list is false, but believe it or not cannabis is very addictive. I smoke weed everyday and have minor but obvious changes in attitude if I don't smoke up every now and then. Its addicting but its not very hazardous to health and I love it:D
thanked the writer.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
That is not true at all. Marijuana is not physically addictive. Possibly mental depending on your mind. I doubt you have even smoked. Besides if you do anything everyday, you can get addicted including tv and videogames
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
How come were aloud to smoke the most addicting thing in the world(according to this list, which by the way is bogus for the most part, I do agree the nicotine is one of the top ones for sure though) but were not aloud to smoke one of the least addictive because apparently its SO dangerous. Good example of how we are ruled by a bunch of money hungry tools, that don't care about our health, but care about money. Come on people how can you say marijuana is bad when your smoking one of the worst drugs in the world in your own living room. I love watching politicians saying marijuana is bad when there puffing on there cigarettes.
thanked the writer.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
The key difference being that with cigarette, you are only a danger to yourself, (second hand smoke is debatable) however with marijuana, you can quickly become a danger to others.

I'd say alcohol and cigarette's are the most widespread because for the most part, they're socially acceptable. That's not to say however that they are the most addictive.

I can go without drinking, and i hate smoke so meh...
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
That other guy who commented is so ill informed. Marijuana has no properties that would cause you to be a danger to others. Being drunk is worse. The only dangerous thing about it would possibly be driving (still less dangerous than when drinking). You have no idea xeroxide. And second hand smoke is not debatable at all it is proven dangrous. I bet you havent done anything at all you trip.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
What the heck this doesn't make any sense sure nicotine is addictive but not that addictive
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Benzos in general are the most addicting and they will give you seizures if you stop long term dosages cold turkey
Joe Joe Profile
Joe Joe answered
I would have thought it was Alcohol, I read a book called Binge to Blackout about alcohol. I think everybody needs to read that book
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I always thought it was cocoa ie chocolate then proberbly nicotine but I don't even see cocoa in this list
Lois Dawes Profile
Lois Dawes answered
Addictive implies two things.: One cannot do without the drug once one has had some experience with it; and two that by an addictive habit the user causes harm to self as he does his society/social interactions. My vote for the most addictive drugs are Greed (the unrepenentant desire for more of what you have) and Lust (the unquenching desire for something you do not have). See why the world is in the mess it now is in. So few listened and acted upon the words of the Most High God.

As for the other things popularized as addictive drugs so often the answer is subjective to person and country based on diet and the level of freedom to "imbibe", because of this I am sure that the answer would vary from country to country; and by the dominance of greed and lust in each society's population. Lives motivated by greed and lust can cause an uncomfortable State: The stress, the anger, the hate, the crime, the inability to cope with the fear, the sence of lack/hopelessness. The physical illnesses,all of which are reasons why people take drugs in the first place. In countries where drugs are taken for spiritual reasons,,, the mal-effects are not predominant among the religious. This then begs the questions..Is it the drug or the environment in which the drug is used that causes the danger to man and his society?
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
This is retarded. I used to smoke 2 packs a day, and often 1 pack in 2-3 hours. I had to quit, and quit without a second thought. Nicotine is NOT addictive to some people. However, it is definitely addictive to others. I, am not addicted no matter how much I smoke, however, some of my friends, and my parents are addicted. I guess it's just genetics...

Also, weed is not addictive in the way this article is formatted. This article is talking about physically addictive substances, not mentally. I do not crave for weed, however, I simply enjoy it when I can. It's like eating chocolate and liking it, and wanting to eat more of it. It is not a physical addiction.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The answer by James_th is misleading in the extreme. The data on which the answer is based are apparently relative rankings of addictiveness, not some objective standard. Those relative rankings are by a limited set of experts and thus opinions may vary between experts. The way this is written "addiction likeliness" implies quite strongly that this is about some objective standard associated with the drug compounds themselves. In one of the data sets it is clear that nicotine is set to 100% and everything else is relative to that. A decent way to rank drugs but this isn't made that clear in the answer.

Furthermore, it is a fundamental mistake to talk about "addictiveness" without specifying what measures of this concept are driving your ranking. Propensity for causing acute and directly observable withdrawal? Relative ease of individuals discontinuing use? The number of people who eventually meet criteria for dependence out of ...which population? Those who use X amount? Y amount? Over A, B or C interval?

It is a complicated question which deserves more than trite answers enhanced with salacious photographs of (most likely) extreme cases.
thanked the writer.
Chris Tackett
Chris Tackett commented
This can only be answered on a per user basis. This question is a catch 22 so to say. If caffene is your "drug of choice" then its going to be your "most addictive" if you like speed the meth or coccaine will probably be in your top 5. If your " drug of choice" is opiates then heroin of oxy will probably be in your top 5.

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