I Read Somewhere That Babies Are Born Without Knee Caps. Is This True? The Article Said That They Dont Get Formed Until The Baby Is About Six To 1 Year Old.

16 Answers

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The answer to this depends on how you define the kneecap. Babies are not born with a kneecap like an adult’s – but then, very little of their body is like an adult’s. A majority of a baby’s body at birth is cartilage. This is why babies and toddlers can bend in ways that make grown-ups cringe. Their skull is made up of moving plates that don’t become hard until several years later, and the kneecap is very much like that.
A baby’s kneecap is cartilage. As the baby grows, the cartilage slowly changes to bone. For girls, they’ll have a "normal" kneecap of bone by around age three, assuming normal calcium intake. Boys’ kneecaps don’t turn fully from cartilage to bone until around age 5.
So the form of the knee and the kneecap is there, it’s just made of a different material.
d ds Profile
d ds answered
Babies are not actually born without knee caps; they do have knee caps at the time of birth. These knee caps are however made out of cartilage and therefore are very soft and fragile. These knee caps turn bony, a process known as ossification, when the child reaches an age of around 3 years and continues till the age of 6. After that, they become hard and bony. In case a baby is born without knee caps, then it is not normal and is a medical condition known a 'Nail Patella Syndrome'.
Jennifer Carey Profile
Jennifer Carey answered
Did you know that babies are not born with kneecaps, in their delicate knees?
As such, if you xray a babies' knees they do not show up the same as a big kid or adult; due to the fact that at birth, a baby's kneecaps are still just cartillage.  The cartillage eventually develops into kneecaps as we know and love them.   However, your baby and toddler will have to take a few spills while learning to crawl and walk in the growth phase.  From the time your baby is somewhere between 3 to 5 years old, your baby will grow kneecaps as big kids and adults.  
Through the crawling stage your baby actually falls on cartillage that acts like a "sponge- compressor" to protect the developing kneecap.  Most babies will find crawling fun and easy, but will often have red, sore, and bruised knees due to the floor surfaces and pulling up and falling down of the learning to crawl stages.  Having the benefit of kneepad protection allows your baby to crawl in comfort and learn to walk or pull up and push a toddling trike in safety and comfort.  This developmental stage also has immeasurable benefits for co-ordination and right and left brain functions for use later in life.  Helping your child to play and explore in comfort is a fun time for both child and parent.  
To sift through the available choices of baby crawling kneepads on the market, always look for kneepads that are:
• Easy to attach and remove over bare legs and clothing
• Machine washable and dryable
• One size fits all
• Non slip on all surfaces
Once your baby begins to push up while on their bellies, they will soon be ready for crawling.  This is the time to begin attaching the kneepads so baby gets used to feeling them on the knees.  Soon they will be up and all around the home, exploring their environment and the most important time for a parent to have a completely "Baby proofed" home.  For more information check out www.babybumpers.com.au. Happy crawling!
Daisy Sarma Profile
Daisy Sarma answered
That babies do not have knee caps at birth is not exactly true. All of us are born with knee caps. The knee caps of human beings actually form at the foetal stage, during the fourth month actually. However, at that point and until later, the knee caps are not ossified; they are made of cartilage. The growth centres around the knee caps form only a little prior to birth, and, in some cases, just after birth.

The kneecaps are there, only not ossified, as mentioned earlier. The ossification happens much later, when the child is around three years old, in the case of females, and four to five years in the case of males. There is no clear answer yet as to why this happens. Tests have shown that tissue ossification happens only when it has to bear body weight. It seems like it is good biological strategy, because ossification requires energy, and if the body were to have ossification before the bones were ready to bear weight, then the body would spend needless energy, which could have been better spent doing something else.
Kalyhn Profile
Kalyhn answered
A few months ago I read that babies are not born with knee caps they could get them from ages 3mths to 1 year old.hope I have helped,rate me.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Birth...That's What Up
Tyler Carey Profile
Tyler Carey answered
Did you know that babies are not
born with kneecaps, in their delicate knees?

As such, if you xray a babies' knees
they do not show up the same as a big kid or adult; due to the fact that at
birth, a baby's kneecaps are still just cartilage.  The cartilage
eventually develops into kneecaps as we know and love
them.   However, your baby and toddler will have to take a few
spills while learning to crawl and walk in the growth phase.  From the
time your baby is somewhere between 3 to 5 years old, your baby will grow
kneecaps as big kids and adults. 

Through the crawling stage your baby
actually falls on cartilage that acts like a "sponge- compressor" to
protect the developing kneecap.  Most babies will find crawling fun and
easy, but will often have red, sore, and bruised knees due to the floor
surfaces and pulling up and falling down of the learning to crawl stages. 
Having the benefit of kneepad protection allows your baby to crawl in comfort
and learn to walk or pull up and push a toddling trike in safety and
comfort.  This developmental stage also has immeasurable benefits for
co-ordination and right and left brain functions for use later in life. 
Helping your child to play and explore in comfort is a fun time for both child
and parent. 

To sift through the available
choices of baby crawling kneepads on the market, always look for kneepads that
are:

Easy to attach and remove over bare legs and clothingMachine washable and dryableOne size fits allNon slip on all surfaces

Once your baby begins to push up
while on their bellies, they will soon be ready for crawling.  This is the
time to begin attaching the kneepads so baby gets used to feeling them on the
knees.  Soon they will be up and all around the home, exploring their
environment and the most important time for a parent to have a completely
"Baby proofed" home.  For more information check out www.babybumpers.com.au.
Happy crawling!
Beth Jones Profile
Beth Jones answered
This is true. Babies and kids have more bones in their bodies than adults until they start to grow. Then as they grow the bones connect.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
yes babies do have knee caps they do not show up on the x-rays . Thay are formed about the forth month in the wond
Mia Teeliumtrozzle Profile
This is true. Babies do not have knee caps when they are born.The knee caps usually grow when the child is between 2 and 6 years old.
thanked the writer.
Marie Koch
Marie Koch commented
They don't have BONEY knee caps but they have knee caps
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Obviously you do not have a baby... Either that or you have not tested this theory before making an a$$ of yourself online

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