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What Happens When Your Body Gets Too Cold?

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When your body gets too cold, the natural defence mechanism is to try to keep the vital organs warm. In fact, the body pulls blood away from the extremities such as the arms and legs in an attempt to keep the rest of the body and more importantly, the vital organs of the heart and brain, warm.

If the body is exposed to extreme cold for a period of time, the individual could end up contracting severe frost bite or hypothermia. In more severe cases, it could even lead to death as the body becomes unable to pump blood and oxygen around the body to its vital organs.

A lot of people die when left in very cold water as the body stops pumping blood to their arms and legs. This means the muscles do not have enough glucose or oxygen in them to keep the individual moving. The body is trying to conserve as much energy as it possible can. In the same way, even on a normal day when a cool breeze blows and makes a person feel a bit cold, the hairs on their arms and legs may stand on end. This is sometimes known as ‘goose bumps’ and is the body’s way of trying to trap air to keep it well insulated and warm.

There are three stages of hypothermia. In severe cases where the individual contracts hypothermia, their body temperature can drop down as far as 32 degrees C in the worst cases. The person will have difficulty speaking and they may have trouble trying to use their arms and legs as the muscles have started to fade. The pulse rate may increase but their breathing may slow down. The major organs may then begin to fail and this could ultimately lead to death.
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9. In a really cold environment, thermo receptors (sensory neurons) in your skin would detect the cold temperature and would send an impulse to inter neurons in the spinal cord and brain and to motor neurons which would send the impulse to an effector organ. This organ (the skin) would cause you to get goosebumps and shiver. Your skin would go pale and a little ‘blue’ due to the cold temperature, because the blood doesn't flow as usual. Sometimes, your heart rate would also go up, to try and pump more blood into your body.
When it gets too hot, thermo receptors (sensory neurons) in your skin would detect the hot temperature and would send an impulse to inter neurons in the spinal cord and brain and to motor neurons which would send the impulse to an effector organ. This organ (the skin) would cause you to get perspire, in an attempt to cool your body down by saturating it in water.
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Your muscles shiver,- rapid contractions release heat and energy from respiration.
Body hair raised the layer of air next to the skin as insulation.
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Hypothermia
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Well, I know that the medical phenomenon "Reynaud's" can occur on the extremities, such as the ears, nose, fingers and toes, if those areas are exposed to cold temperatures for very long. Symptoms of this condition can vary, but my experience began with cold toes. It progressed to red, itchy blotches on my toes. Finally, certain digits turned purplish-blue and began to lose feeling, similar to the "my arm is asleep" tingling sensation one may get when a nerve is pinched and momentary sensations are lost in a certain area of the body. This can be diagnosed by a doctor who may refer you to a cardiovascular specialist or a foot doctor, as was the case with me. Looking back, I now realize the symptoms began not long after our heating system broke while we were having an unusually cold winter. I feel the cold temperatures are what triggered this condition. It has improved since warmer temperatures have returned with the spring weather.
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When the body temperature drops below 37.5 degrees, the metabolism which is the chemical reactions occurring in the body slows down, as the particles do not  have enough (activation) energy to collide and form reactions, therefore the overall function and repairs slow down. This can cause many symptoms and syndromes such as allergies, aggression, asthma, dizziness, tiredness and hypothermia. Cold temperature can also make a person lose the ability to think and confusion as there is no energy and blood in the brain to help it focus ...x M3hv!sh x...
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When the human body gets too cold a couple things can happen to the body. One of these things is that if the human body gets too cold you can get frostbite and your body parts will fall of and you will eventually die sooner or later. Another one of these things is that if your body temperature drops below 37.5 degrees the metabolism which is the chemical reactions that slow the body down. The last thing is that you can get hypothermia and the hypothermia can shut the body down.
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Ice crystals form in the water inside your cells which slices them apart, ultimately causing death.
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You get hypothermia, frostbite and you become unconscious, then you get to meet god!
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Hypothermia sets in and the body shuts down on itself as its too cold to operate on and sooner or later one dies

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