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Can You Get Bone Spurs On The Arches Of Feet?

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Ian John Profile
Ian John answered
Bone spurs form where a tendon or ligament is strained to the extent that it pulls the periosteum, the fibrous membrane which covers bones into which tendons and ligaments bind, away from the bone it covers. The gap then fills-in with new bone forming a spur. In the foot the most common site is the bottom surface of the heel bone known as a heel bone.

A calcaneal spur or heel spur is a radiological finding, and when it is located on the inferior aspect of the calcaneus it is often associated with plantar fasciitis. A posterior calcaneal spur may also develop on the back of the heel at the insertion of the Achilles tendon.

An inferior calcaneal spur consists of a calcification of bone, which lies superior to the plantar fascia at the insertion of the plantar fascia. Posterior heel spurs are often large and palpable through the skin and may need to be removed as part of the treatment of insertional Achilles tendonitis.

Plantar fasciitis is a painful inflammatory process of the plantar fascia. Longstanding cases of plantar fasciitis often demonstrate more degenerative changes than inflammatory changes, in which case they are termed plantar fasciosis.

The plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue originating on the bottom surface of the calcaneus and extending along the sole of the foot towards the five toes. It has been reported that plantar fasciitis occurs in two million Americans a year and 10% of the population over a lifetime. It is commonly associated with long periods of weight bearing. Amongst non-athletic populations, it is associated with a high body mass index.

The pain is usually felt on the underside of the heel and is often most intense with the first steps of the day. Another symptom is that the sufferer has difficulty bending the foot so that the toes are brought toward the shin, decreased dorsiflexion of the ankle. A symptom commonly recognized among sufferers of plantar fasciitis is increased probability of knee pains, especially among runners.
helen baillie-gutteridge Profile
Bone spurs form where a tendon or ligament is strained to the extent that it pulls the periosteum (the fibrous membrane which covers bones into which tendons and ligaments blend) away from the bone it covers. the gap then fills-in with new bone forming a spur. in the foot the most common site is the bottom surface of the heel bone. It sounds like yours is a new bump of bone on the top of the arch? In which case you have "lipping" of a tarsal joint, not a spur at all.

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