Why Is Our Blood Red?

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8 Answers

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Hemoglobin makes the blood red as it contains an iron in it
E Jacobson Profile
E Jacobson answered
Blood is red because of the number of red cells which exist in each drop of blood, far outweighing the white cells.  The cells are red because this is the inherent colour of the cell, resulting from its genetic and structural make up.    This begs the question, why red?  Well, whether evolution or God created mankind, the use of red for blood is possibly the best colour that could have been chosen.  Red is a colour which is very bright and distinguishable from other colours.  Thus it is always easy to know that we are bleeding.  Whatever the colour of our skin, blood is always highly visible, so it acts as a means of telling us to stop whatever we are doing and attend to the blood flow (i.e. Try to stop it).  If blood were white or very pale, it is possible that we wouldn't immediately be able to tell that we were bleeding and could incur serious blood loss before we tended to the wound.  With bright red blood pouring out of us we cannot help but fail to notice it. 
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I'm only grade 6 that's one of my assignment can you pls help
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
..because red blood cells(RBC's) or erythrocytes are the most abundant cells in your body.. ..do you know that you have about 25 trillion erythrocytes? ..each erythrocytes circulates throughout your whole body three times.. ..RBCs carry oxygen throughout the body.. ..oxygen is needed to burn glucose and other fuels to make energy.. ..RBCs in their cruise back to the heart are not empty; they pick up carbon dioxide , a waste product.. ..they bring carbon dioxide to the lungs to be expelled out of the body..
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Blood is red because of the presence of haemoglobin, which is a red chemical. However, about forty percent of blood is not red at all, but white(because there's no haemoglobin present).This is a watery type of blood and is known as plasma.
Steve Theunissen Profile
That is because of the red cells (erythrocytes) in your blood. In one cubic millimeter, about as big as the dot on an "I," a man has some five million red cells. You have about half a million less if you are a woman. Each red cell is a tiny rounded disk that is slightly indented on the two sides. You cannot see them with the unaided eye, for it would take 3,200 of them placed side by side to measure an inch (2.5 centimeters).

Without any conscious effort you are constantly forming these important red cells in the bone marrow of your ribs, skull and vertebrae. Each second some 1.2 million of them wear out and are removed by your spleen and liver. Yet, the iron and other important materials of your worn-out red cells are used in various ways, including the making of new cells.
thanked the writer.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
I needed to know that so badly for a highschool test and home work thank you so much
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
My teacher told me that the long bones in out legs make our blood red.....so I guess he either lied, I misunderstood, or he just didn't know...

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